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aircraft tires parts

Given that we see car tires blow out on the freeway pretty often, it’s a wonder why we don’t see the same thing happening with aircraft tires. With how much weight they support on landing, and the fact the aircraft is flying at about 170 mph, this is an amazing feat. The tires are designed to support about a 38-ton load, and this is accomplished primarily through the amount of pressure they contain. Because of the tire material and pressure, they have incredible strength and endurance. They can land 500 times before needing a retread, and they can be retreaded about seven times before needing to be completely replaced.

Federal regulations require that the tires be capable of withstanding four times their rated pressure for 3 seconds. They are made using bias-ply construction. This means that the plies of reinforcing materials are embedded in the rubber at angles between 30 and 60 degrees to the centerline of the tire. This design creates balanced strength. Composite materials are utilized to save weight, increase strength, and because they generate less heat. It might be surprising, but high strength material is used primarily to support high pressure inflations rather than resist impact on landing.

Aircraft tires are inflated to 200 psi, which is about six times that of a car tire. They are pumped up with nitrogen in order to accommodate varying temperatures during flight. Dry nitrogen expands at the same rate as air but doesn’t contain moisture. Moisture increases the expansion rate with temperature, which causes the tire to over-expand and may cause it to explode.

Because the FAA regulates tire construction, all aircraft tires are safe. However, not all aircraft tires are safe to use on every aircraft. For example, an F-16 needs to have tires that can be pressurized up to 320 psi. So, it’s important to consult the aircraft OEM’s manual to know which tires to use.

At Accelerating RFQs, owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, we can help you find all the aircraft tires you need, new or obsolete. For a quick and competitive quote, email us at sales@acceleratingrfqs.com or call us at 1-780-851-3631. 


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aircraft jack parts

There are two main types of aircraft hydraulic jacks that are used in aviation— axle and airframe (tripod) jacks. Though different in some capacities, the two operate using similar aircraft jack parts and standardized aircraft hydraulic fluid. Furthermore, both have important safety features in the case of malfunction or overload. Let’s take a look at the different types of aviation aircraft jacks, and the general maintenance protocols for both.

Axle jacks are typically used for the purpose of maintaining tires, wheels, and struts. In order to raise the aircraft, they are attached to the nose gear or main landing gear. For safety, the jack is equipped with a bypass valve. In the event that the applied load exceeds 10% over the specified load capacity, the bypass valve will bypass fluid to prevent damage. There are three variations of an axle jack that are commonly seen in aviation, all of which meet different load requirements. These include hand-carried, horseshoe, and outrigger.

Hand-carried axle jacks are, as their name suggests, relatively easier to transport than the others. They operate using single or double manually operated hydraulic pumps. Horseshoe axle jacks have a stationary piston, and two hydraulic cylinders that power a lifting arm. Lastly, an outrigger axle jack is the largest and heaviest of the three. This jack has a two-speed pump mounted on its frame, which operates the hydraulic cylinder.

Airframe (tripod) jacks are usually employed to lift an entire aircraft. Depending on the type of aircraft, it may require this jack to be placed on the wing, nose, fuselage, or tail.

There are two distinct types of tripod jack, called fixed height and variable height. Given its name, the height of the tripod components on a variable height jack can be adjusted by adding leg extensions.

Preoperational maintenance is critical to ensure that aircraft jacks are safe to operate. A preoperational inspection should occur before every use. There are a few elements that should be inspected regularly regardless of varying type, including fluid level verification, joint damage and fatigue, missing or bent components, and locknut condition. In addition, when performing maintenance, you’ll want to pay attention to the aircraft jack classification numbers. They vary depending on the type of jack and its load capacity and will help you determine the necessary protocols for inspection.

Both aircraft jack varieties are categorized with a specific labeling system to ensure proper care and maintenance. For example, a model might be designated A25-1HS. The “A” indicates axle, the number 25 indicates the load capacity in tons, followed by a specific jack identification number, in this case the number one. The proceeding two letters indicate that the jack is either outrigger (OR), hand carried (HC), or horseshoe (HS). Tripod jacks are labeled similarly to axle jacks. For instance, let’s consider the tripod label “T20-1VH5”. Every identification parameter is the same, excluding the “T”, and the last three items. A tripod is classified as fixed height (FH) or variable height (VH). The additional number at the end of the model designation, represents the number of leg extension kits that can be applied; in this case, there are five.

At Accelerating RFQs, owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, we can help you find all the aircraft jack lifting parts and spacer blocks parts you need, new or obsolete. For a quick and competitive quote, email us at sales@acceleratingrfqs.com or call us at +1-780-851-3631.


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navigation-signs

Every airport in the world, despite their very different layouts, uses the same basic signage to direct planes to and from the terminals. And that’s because taxiing a plane is significantly more difficult than piloting a plane.

Planes, as one might imagine, are not really suited for driving the way they are suited for flying. They have incredibly wide wingspans, as wide as 230 ft, making them hard to gauge the clearance for. To make matters worse, they are swept wings; while their shape increases aerodynamics significantly, they do make gauging the clearance more difficult than they already are. Planes also have long bodies with the forwardmost wheel, the nose wheel, far behind the cockpit, making turns quite the tribulation. The pilots can’t make a turn the way they would in a car, they have to pass the actual turn before they begin making their turn in order to avoid hitting the grass. They’re also incredibly heavy, making a tight turn in a commercial plane requires added thrust, but that’s less than ideal on a busy tarmac with so many other hazards nearby. The only way a pilot can be prepared to taxi their plane is to understand the layout of the tarmac and know how to navigate all the signs, lines, lights, etc.

Every airport has their own rules dictated by their layout, but they all have the same standard lines. White lines and white lights are used to mark runways; the lights are used to mark the edge and the center line. On the other hand, yellow lines and blue lights are typically used to mark taxiways. The blue lights mark the edges of the taxiways while green lights mark the center line. Typically, the lights are embedded in such a way that if they plane is perfectly centered in the lanes, the pilot can feel it as the nose wheel bumps over the center lines.

Signs are another common fixture of any airport tarmac. Like highways, the runways all have names; they can be named anything from a single letter to a combination of letters and numbers. Other descriptions like “inner”, “outer”, “North”, or “West” may also be used. And like with the lines, a yellow sign is typically indicative of a taxiway. As a plane approaches the runway, it is confronted with two-digit numbers like “04”, either posted on signs or painted on the runway. This tells the pilot that they are approaching Runway 04, which got its name from its orientation rounded off to the nearest tenth; Runway 04 has a bearing of approximately 040 degrees northeast. In the opposite direction of the same runway is Runway 22 with a bearing of approximately 220 degrees southwest. If runways are parallel, airports typically add an “R”, “L”, or “C” to the runway name for “right”, “left”, and “center”.

At Accelerating RFQs, owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, we can help you find all the aircraft cockpit parts, nose wheel components, and wingtip parts you need, new or obsolete. For a quick and competitive quote, email us at sales@acceleratingrfqs.com or call us at +1-780-851-3631.


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aircraft wing parts

Various factors need to be taken into consideration when designing an aircraft, the most important being its function. For example, the demands of a commercial jet and a military fighter jet are completely different, resulting in various different requirements, which in turn result in different degrees of complexity in design and composition. A wide range of materials may be used in the design of an aircraft, each with their own strength, elasticity, density, and corrosion resistance ratings.

Wood, bearing sufficient mechanical and physical properties to achieve flight, was used in the construction of first generation of aircraft. Today, wood is no longer used because of its limitations in strength and durability, with other materials with significantly higher strength-to-weight ratios readily available. Following wood, metals such as steel, aluminum, titanium, and other alloys were introduced to the burgeoning aviation industry. In addition to metals, composite materials were also introduced due to their strength, relatively low weight, and resistance to corrosion. As composite materials become more advanced, they have gradually begun to increase in popularity, leading to the decline of metallic materials too.

Aircraft wings are different than the rest of the aircraft in that they can be designed as a combination of different types of materials depending on the structural function. The spars, skin, ribs, ailerons, and flaps all have their own specifications and support different loads, thus requiring different materials. Generally, metals like steel are preferable for the ribs while composite materials are preferable for the skin and control surfaces.

The aviation industry continues to make advancements. As research in composite materials progresses, aircraft are becoming more aerodynamic and fuel efficient. With ultralight structures made from composite materials, aircraft manufacturers can design aircraft that have reduced drag and nose levels, potentially increasing fuel efficiency. Even a 1% reduction in drag on a large transport aircraft can save up to 400,000 liters of fuel and reduce emissions by around 5000 kg.

Accelerating RFQs, owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, is a leading supplier of aircraft wing parts and components. We have a wide variety of parts to choose from and are available and ready to help you find all the parts you need, 24/7x365. If you’re interested in a quote, email us at sales@acceleratingrfqs.com or call us at +1-780-851-3631.


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aircraft tires

It’s easy to take aircraft tires for granted. They look so simple that it’s easy to forget how even minor flaws can lead to disastrous results. But, a lot of critical design factors go into manufacturing aircraft tires such that they are able to go faster than a racecar while simultaneously supporting more weight than the largest land moving machines.

The design process is intense. Tire manufacturers only start the design process after aircraft manufacturers send the necessary dimensions; manufacturers also have to follow all regulatory requirements, including ones from foreign bodies. Manufacturing only begins after the prototypes pass all mandatory tests and meet all requirements from the aircraft manufacturer and airworthiness authorities.

There are two types of aircraft tires, bias-ply tires and radial tires. Bias-ply tires are popular choices for aircraft tires because they’re durable and retreadable as a result of several different components made up of various layers of strong protective material. Radial tires have rigid belts that provide increased landing and reduced rolling resistances. They also have fewer components and are lighter than their bias-ply counterparts.

In order to ensure safety and increase tire life, it’s important to carry out regularly scheduled inspections. The treads should be visually checked for wear, cuts, and other foreign damage. Things like overinflation, underinflation, sidewall damage, bulges, flat spots, fraying, groove cracking, and indentations are all signs that the tires need to be repaired or replaced. One of the most critical things to inspect is the tire’s inflation.

Overinflation can cause uneven tread wear, reduced traction, cutting, and increased stress on the wheel assemblies. And underinflation can be even worse by causing flex heating which can lead to damage to the rubber compounds, tread and carcass separations, and bead failure.

Other things to note about aircraft tires are temperature changes, contaminants, and operational considerations. There are many ways in which aircraft tires can be damaged. Simply making sure that you regularly inspect and maintain your tires and follow the recommended operational procedures should be more than enough to avoid disasters and extend the life of your tires.       

At Accelerating RFQs, owned and operated by ASAP Semiconductor, we want to be your first choice in supplier for all your aviation and aircraft part requirements, from the new to the obsolete and hard-to-find. Visit us at www.acceleratingrfqs.com or call us at +1-780-851-3631 to get started on a quote.


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