In the realm of electronics, a choke is a type of inductor that may be implemented for the means of managing the flow of current. Generally, such devices are capable of blocking high-frequency alternating currents while permitting the flow of both direct current and lower-frequency alternating current. In this blog, we will discuss the construction and functionality of chokes, allowing you to better understand their uses and functionalities. In general, a choke consists of an insulated wire coil that is wound around a magnetic core, though other types may take advantage of a ferrite material that is strung on a wire. As frequency increases, so too does the impedance of the device. Despite featuring low power loss in regard to passing AC and DC, the reactance of chokes limit the amount of AC that they may transmit.


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A resistor is a type of passive two-terminal electrical component, commonly implemented within an electronic circuit for the means of providing electrical resistance. Resistors can serve many roles ranging from the reduction of current flow to the termination of transmission lines, and various types may be used for particular needs or requirements. The fusible resistor, commonly known as a fuse resistor, is one that may be used for the protection of a circuit. Capable of guarding a system against current load jumps, such resistors are regularly implemented in series with the input main power supply of a device or assembly.


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Flight control surfaces are aerodynamic devices that enable pilot control over an aircraft’s flight attitude, coming in the form of various equipment pieces that are installed on the fuselage, vertical stabilizer, wings, and other structures. The rudder is one of the main directional control surfaces alongside the elevator and ailerons, capable of managing an aircraft’s pitch and roll. With the rudder in particular, pilots manipulate the yaw of the aircraft about its vertical axis for the means of adjusting the direction of the nose. To better understand how the aircraft rudder allows for management of flight attitude and yaw, we will discuss its functionality and how it is used.


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Electricity is a volatile force, presenting various risks to sensitive electronics and individuals if proper protection is not in place. Electrical shocks are a hazard associated with energy sources or conductive materials, occurring when electrical energy suddenly flows into a material or individual when contact is established. Electrical shock can be extremely dangerous, presenting risks of injury or death to individuals or the complete failure of electrical devices. To prevent the hazards associated with electrical shock, components known as grounding straps are regularly used.


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A personal air vehicle, or personal aerial vehicle, is an emerging family of aircraft that is centered around the idea of providing on-demand aviation services. The term was first coined by NASA in 2003 when they established their Personal Air Vehicle Sector Project, that of which is a part of the Aeronautics Vehicle Systems Program. While research and development of personal air vehicles has continued since the initial launch of the program, there have been various barriers that engineers and manufacturers seek to overcome to realize such technologies.


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When conducting maintenance or repair work on an aircraft or other vehicle type, it is important that individuals are able to safely inspect and perform work on all sides of the assembly. With a device known as a hydraulic jack, aircraft can safely be lifted so that accidents, damages, and injuries are all avoided.


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Pressurized air is important for a number of uses such as HVAC systems, filling tires, operating pneumatic tools, and providing safe pressures within aircraft cabins for breathing. In order to quickly and easily produce pressurized air for countless applications, a pneumatic device known as an air compressor is relied upon. With air compressors, power from an electric motor, diesel, gasoline engine, or other source can be used to create potential energy that is stored in pressurized air. As a very common component to numerous systems and devices, understanding the basic functionality of an air compressor can be quite beneficial for anyone taking advantage of them.


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As the method of mounting can affect the accuracy, life, and performance of a bearing, it requires close attention. The bearing’s characteristics should be thoroughly investigated, and mounting should be done in the proper way. The handling procedures for bearings should be fully studied by design engineers such that standards can be established regarding: cleaning of the bearings and associated parts, checking of dimensions and finishes of related parts, mounting, inspection after mounting, and supply of lubricants.


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With the majority of aircraft currently relying on fuel mixtures for propulsion generation, it is always crucial for safety that there is some type of fuel quantity indicating system present. With a mixture of fuel flow indicators and fuel gauges, pilots can closely monitor the amount of fuel present in the fuel tank, as well as the rates at which fuel is spent to ensure an efficient and safe flight operation. In this blog, we will provide an overview of fuel flow indicators and fuel gauges, allowing you to better understand the uses that they provide to the aircraft engine and pilot.


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Although there are many sizes, shapes, and types of helicopters, most of them share the same major components. Understanding how each of these parts operates can help a pilot more easily locate malfunctions and possible emergency scenarios, and knowledge of the relationship these systems have to one another enables the pilot to make an educated decision and take the appropriate course of action in the event that a problem arises.


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The elevator is an example of a primary flight control system. It controls movement about the lateral axis of an aircraft: a movement referred to as pitch. They are also used to control the angle of attack and aid in creating lift. In most aircraft, there are two elevators, one mounted on the trailing edge of each half of the horizontal stabilizer. When a control input is made, either manually or by autopilot, the elevators move up or down as needed. In most installations, the elevator moves symmetrically. However, in certain aircraft controlled by fly-by-wire technology, the elevators move differently from each other in order to meet the control input demands.


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A disc brake is a type of brake that utilizes calipers to squeeze pairs of pads against a disc or rotor to create friction. This action slows the rotation of the shaft, such as a vehicle axle, either reducing rotational speed or holding it stationary. The energy of motion is then converted into waste heat, which must be disposed of. Hydraulically actuated disc brakes are the most commonly used form of brake for motor vehicles, but the principles of a disc brake can be applied to virtually any rotating shaft.


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The yoke is among the most important parts of an aircraft. Also known as the control wheel or control column, the yoke is a device used for piloting certain fixed-wing aircraft. The pilot uses the yoke to control the attitude of the plane, typically in both pitch and roll. Rotation of the yoke controls the ailerons as well as the roll axis. Fore and aft movement of the yoke controls the elevator and pitch axis. When the pilot pulls back on the yoke, the nose of the aircraft rises. When the yoke is pushed forward, the nose is lowered. Similarly, when the yoke is turned left the plane rolls to the left, and when it is turned to the right, the plane rolls right.


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To carry out the many complex operations that are required for a safe and efficient flight, there needs to be reliable energy sources in place on aircraft that systems can use to maintain power and functionality. The auxiliary power unit (APU) is an energy source that is commonly found on airliners and business jets, and they typically serve as an additional energy source to start the main engines, as well as provide power for the operation of various onboard systems, avionics, and electronics while at the gate of an airport.


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If you are somewhat familiar with aircraft, you may have noticed that some differ from each other in regards to the configuration of the aircraft wing. The two most common configurations present on aircraft are the high wing and low wing style, and each provides different capabilities and functionalities. In this blog, we will discuss the differences between these two wing types, as well as how they impact the performance of the aircraft that they are attached to.


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Ever since the first powered, heavier-than-air flight in 1903, a multitude of fixed-wing aircraft types and representations have come about from a variety of manufacturers and developers. While designs of aircraft have constantly evolved and undergone innovation to meet needed applications, some primary components have become concrete to aircraft design. In this blog, we will provide a brief overview of some of these primary aircraft components that are featured across most designs, and how they serve aircraft flight operations.


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Studs and other fasteners are crucial in any application to ensure that important pieces and components are held together during operation. In the high-stakes aerospace, aviation, and defense industries, where fasteners are subject to extreme conditions at high altitudes, they are that much more important. Before looking at studs, it’s important to understand fasteners as a whole. All studs are fasteners, but not all fasteners are studs. In addition to studs, fasteners refer to bolts, screws, nuts, and rivets. The singular purpose of fasteners is to join parts together. Fasteners are not intended to position aircraft parts relative to another, or to operate similarly to axles, pivots, or fulcrums.


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Among important tools that are necessary for a pilot to carry when boarding a flight are headsets. Pilots must use headsets to communicate with the ground crew, as well as with FAA authorities or other groups that can help with navigating the airspace. Communication outside of the cockpit is essential as the pilot will have to be vigilant of any news regarding their flight, such as objects that are in the path of the aircraft, other planes, etc. That’s why it is of utmost importance that a pilot, whether operating for a commercial airline or for a small private plane, must ensure that they have a proper efficient headset with which to communicate with their ground crew and other important authorities. For more information on top headsets, read on below.


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Aircraft batteries are a vital component of aircraft functionality, providing ground power, emergency power, clearing faults, improving DC bus stability, and much more. The aircraft battery’s main function is to start the auxiliary power unit (APU) or generator of the aircraft, which then takes over for system powering and charges the battery through the rest of the flight. Typically, smaller aircraft feature lead acid batteries while larger commercial and corporate aircraft utilize NiCd batteries for powering.


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If you’ve never worked within the aircraft industry, then you’ve probably never asked yourself what aircraft cables, are and which are the best for cutting wires without fraying. But if you’re here browsing our site, chances are that you’re definitely working in aviation and aerospace in some sector. And some information on aircraft cable cutters wouldn't hurt, so here we go.


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Landing and Taxiing aircraft used to be much harder than it is today. Before planes were equipped with the current tricycle wheel landing configuration, early aircraft had what is called a Taildragger. The landing gear of a Taildragger is located ahead of the aircraft’s center of gravity with a steerable tailwheel in the back that keeps the tail from touching the ground. This tilts the nose of the plane up and the tail down. On the other hand, tricycle gear, with its center of gravity behind the landing gear, sits an aircraft evenly on the runway, making it easier to taxi and land. It takes a pilot with sharpened skills and a special technique to land and taxi a Taildragger because of its offset center of gravity and here’s why.


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Power plants are the engine of the aircraft, aiding in their ability to achieve flight through the generation of thrust. An aircraft power plant may vary in its configuration, sometimes being a singular jet engine, or they may contain propellers aircraft and other components alongside the engine. The configuration mostly depends on the type of aircraft or rotorcraft and its needs. The two most common forms of aircraft power plants are the piston engine and gas turbine engine.


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Each day, millions of passengers worldwide board flights that span the entire globe. With thousands of aircraft racking up countless hours of flight, there is invariably the constant need for repair, maintenance, and new parts. Because of this, the aircraft parts market is in constant movement with an overflow of requests. What follows is a rundown of the ten most commonly purchased aircraft spare parts and a brief explanation of each.


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Aircraft tires are paramount to the functionality of an aircraft through bearing their weight, aiding with braking, absorbing shock from landings, and allowing for taxiing through the airstrip. Due to this, aircraft tires undergo meticulous maintenance, overhaul, and repair during their lifetime. They are also manufactured with high standards to endure the pressures they are subjected to. Aircraft tires may be tube-type or tubeless, and are further classified by factors such as type, ply rating, and whether they are bias ply tires or radials.


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Technical Standard Order (TSO), is a minimum performance standard that is set out by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) for aircraft appliances and equipment for use on civil aircraft. The FAA can approve TSO authorization for manufacturers regarding specific components. This means that the manufacturer is authorized to manufacture TSO standard materials, aviation parts, and appliances. This does not, however, give them approval to be able to install the piece on an aircraft.


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Operating aircraft batteries outside their ambient temperature or charging voltage limits can result in excessive cell temperatures, leading to electrolyte boiling, rapid deterioration of the cells, and battery failure. The relationship between maximum charging voltage and the number of cells is also important, as this determines the rate at which energy is absorbed as heat within the battery. For lead-acid batteries, the voltage per cell must not exceed 2.35 volts, while NiCd batteries usually have 1.4 and 1.5 volts.


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As commercial aircraft have gotten larger and heavier, their landing speeds have gotten higher and higher as well. This has made bringing aircraft to a stop more difficult, as these aircraft require longer and longer landing strips. In many cases, brakes can no longer be solely relied upon to slow the aircraft. Therefore, many commercial aircraft now use thrust reversers. Thrust reversers, as their name implies, reverses the thrust generated by the engines to slow the aircraft. Thrust reversers come in two categories: mechanical blockage, and aerodynamic blockage.


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Just as you rely your car to start when you are running late to work, a pilot relies on the aircraft start to avoid costly delays. Turbine engine ignition systems live up to their namesake - they are used in the startup cycle to ignite the fuel in the engine of the aircraft. Unlike other ignition systems such as reciprocating engine ignition systems, turbine engine ignition systems are turned off for the remainder of the flight.


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Given that we see car tires blow out on the freeway pretty often, it’s a wonder why we don’t see the same thing happening with aircraft tires. With how much weight they support on landing, and the fact the aircraft is flying at about 170 mph, this is an amazing feat. The tires are designed to support about a 38-ton load, and this is accomplished primarily through the amount of pressure they contain. Because of the tire material and pressure, they have incredible strength and endurance. They can land 500 times before needing a retread, and they can be retreaded about seven times before needing to be completely replaced.


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There are two main types of aircraft hydraulic jacks that are used in aviation— axle and airframe (tripod) jacks. Though different in some capacities, the two operate using similar aircraft jack parts and standardized aircraft hydraulic fluid. Furthermore, both have important safety features in the case of malfunction or overload. Let’s take a look at the different types of aviation aircraft jacks, and the general maintenance protocols for both.


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Every airport in the world, despite their very different layouts, uses the same basic signage to direct planes to and from the terminals. And that’s because taxiing a plane is significantly more difficult than piloting a plane.


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Various factors need to be taken into consideration when designing an aircraft, the most important being its function. For example, the demands of a commercial jet and a military fighter jet are completely different, resulting in various different requirements, which in turn result in different degrees of complexity in design and composition. A wide range of materials may be used in the design of an aircraft, each with their own strength, elasticity, density, and corrosion resistance ratings.


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It’s easy to take aircraft tires for granted. They look so simple that it’s easy to forget how even minor flaws can lead to disastrous results. But, a lot of critical design factors go into manufacturing aircraft tires such that they are able to go faster than a racecar while simultaneously supporting more weight than the largest land moving machines.


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